Courses

This is an advanced graduate course on quantum algorithms for students with prior experience in quantum information. The course will cover algorithms that allow quantum computers to solve problems faster than classical computers.

Quantum computers have the potential to efficiently solve problems that are intractable for classical computers. This course will explore the foundation of quantum computing. As this is a multidisciplinary subject, the course will cover basic concepts in theoretical computer science and physics in addition to introducing core quantum computing topics. No previous background in quantum mechanics is required.

Investigates the physical systems used to implement quantum computers. Covers basics of atomic clocks, laser interferometers, quantum key distribution, quantum networks, and three types of qubits (ion-based, superconductor-based, and semiconductor-based).

Quantum Boot Camp is a short course for students interested in taking the Quantum Information Specialization within the College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences and A. James Clark School of Engineering. Designed for computer science, engineering and mathematics majors, Camp introduces basic concepts and techniques that are widely used in quantum information science. Its exercises are elementary versions of those that will be found in the full Quantum Information Specialization courses.

Quantum computers have the potential to efficiently solve certain problems that are intractable for ordinary, classical computers. This course will explore the concept of a quantum computer, including algorithms that outperform classical computation and methods for performing quantum computation reliably in the presence of noise. As this is a multidisciplinary subject, the course will cover basic concepts in theoretical computer science and physics in addition to introducing core quantum computing topics. No previous background in quantum mechanics is required.

Quantum Boot Camp is a short course for students interested in taking the Quantum Information Specialization within the College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences and A. James Clark School of Engineering. Designed for computer science, engineering and mathematics majors, Camp introduces basic concepts and techniques that are widely used in quantum information science. Its exercises are elementary versions of those that will be found in the full Quantum Information Specialization courses.

Quantum computers have the potential to efficiently solve problems that are intractable for classical computers. This course will explore the foundation of quantum computing. As this is a multidisciplinary subject, the course will cover basic concepts in theoretical computer science and physics in addition to introducing core quantum computing topics. No previous background in quantum mechanics is required.

Quantum computers have the potential to efficiently solve certain problems that are intractable for ordinary, classical computers. This course will explore the concept of a quantum computer, including algorithms that outperform classical computation and methods for performing quantum computation reliably in the presence of noise. As this is a multidisciplinary subject, the course will cover basic concepts in theoretical computer science and physics in addition to introducing core quantum computing topics. No previous background in quantum mechanics is required.

Physical principles behind emerging quantum technologies, from quantum-limited amplifiers to atomic simulators. Examination of current and emerging platforms for quantum technologies, including neutral atom, ion trap, superconducting circuit, photonic, and spin-based approaches. Focus on hurdles for implementing quantum devices for new applications.

Quantum computers have the potential to efficiently solve problems that are intractable for classical computers. This course will explore the foundation of quantum computing. As this is a multidisciplinary subject, the course will cover basic concepts in theoretical computer science and physics in addition to introducing core quantum computing topics. No previous background in quantum mechanics is required.