News

Complexity Test Offers New Perspective on Small Quantum Computers

August 6, 2018

State-of-the-art quantum devices are not yet large enough to be called full-scale computers.

Counting Queries Helps New QuICS Hartree Fellow Bound Quantum Advantages

April 16, 2018

Computer scientists love to ask simple questions. But those questions often end up being devilishly tough to answer.

QuICS Doctoral Student Tongyang Li Receives Prestigious IBM Ph.D. Fellowship Award

April 4, 2018

Tongyang Li, a third-year doctoral student in computer science working in the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (QuICS), has been named a 2018 recipient of an IBM Ph.D. Fellowship Award.

QuICS Co-Director Brings Quantum Information Expertise to White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

February 21, 2018

Jacob Taylor, a scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and co-director of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (QuICS), recently took on a new role: advising senior federal officials on the rapidly expanding field of quantum information science.

QuICS Contingent Heads to Premier Quantum Information Conference

January 12, 2018

Research from QuICS is featured in seven talks at the 21st annual Conference on Quantum Information Processing (QIP).

New QuICS Hartree Fellow Studies Computation and Constraints

January 4, 2018

Aarthi Sundaram, a recently arrived Hartree Postdoctoral Fellow, will continue with her research involving computation and constraints.

Quantum Physics and Gravity Meet in Newest QuICS Fellow’s Research

November 30, 2017

Brian Swingle, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Maryland and the newest fellow of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science, is exploring the connections between quantum physics and gravity.

Quantum simulators wield control over more than 50 qubits

November 30, 2017

Two independent teams of scientists, one of which is from the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science and the Joint Quantum Institute, have used more than 50 interacting atomic qubits to mimic magnetic quantum matter, blowing past the complexity of previous demonstrations. The results appear in this week’s issue of Nature.

Congressional hearing highlights need for quantum technology initiative

November 8, 2017

On October 24, 2017, two Fellows of the Joint Quantum Institute and the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science were among those that testified during a joint congressional committee hearing on the topic of American Leadership in Quantum Technology.

QuICS Brings 200 Scientists to UMD for Quantum Error Correction Conference

September 8, 2017

Nearly 200 scientists and theorists from around the world will attend the 4th International Conference on Quantum Error Correction (QEC17), organized by QuICS and Georgia Tech.

Newest QuICS Fellow Expands Research Beyond the Intersection of Computer Science and Physics

August 23, 2017

Xiaodi Wu—the newest QuICS Fellow—is intrigued by research topics beyond the intersection of computer science and physics.

QuICS Hosts Workshop Blending Computer Science and Modern Physics

August 4, 2017

The Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science (QuICS) recently hosted a workshop focused on the intersection of computational complexity and high-energy physics.

QuICS Fellow Shares His Journey to Becoming a Quantum Mathematician

August 3, 2017

QuICS Fellow and mathematician Carl Miller shares his academic journey from pure mathematics to quantum information science.

Quantum Thermometer or Optical Refrigerator?

June 22, 2017

In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them.

JQI Podcast: The Limits of Computation

May 18, 2017

Modern computers, which dwarf their forebears in speed and efficiency, still can't conquer some of the hardest computational problems. Making them even faster probably won't change that.